Why Real Estate Made Me A Millionaire and Investing In Stocks Did Not – MyWifeQuitHerJob.com

I have been playing with options. While I made some decent profit initially, but a couple of bad moves wiped it all. So far I am breaking even. But options feels like a lot more like gambling. Obviously, there are people making living off options and day trading. But hard to find such mentors in real life. I knew one person who was full time commodities trader but I am not sure how big was his account. With small account balance you would be taking on more risky bets to earn livable wage.

Now I am thinking Real Estate might be better investment and wealth building tool. I know several people who are making decent money from their RE investments. Though none of them are truly retired though, still working their day jobs.

“Why Real Estate Made Me A Millionaire and Investing In Stocks Did Not – MyWifeQuitHerJob.com”
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Two hours a week is key dose of nature for health and wellbeing

Research led by the University of Exeter, published in Scientific Reports and funded by NIHR, found that people who spend at least 120 minutes in nature a week are significantly more likely to report good health and higher psychological wellbeing than those who don’t visit nature at all during an average week. However, no such benefits were found for people who visited natural settings such as town parks, woodlands, country parks and beaches for less than 120 minutes a week.

Source: Two hours a week is key dose of nature for health and wellbeing

Even 18th-Century Creatives Tended to Cluster – CityLab

It also appears that belonging to the London cluster made writers substantially more productive. Mitchell finds that the average writer in London saw their productivity go up by 12 percent. By comparison, writers in smaller clusters, in Dublin, Edinburgh, Oxford, and Cambridge, saw no such gains. Furthermore, being part of the London cluster increased the likelihood of an author having their work published in any given year by 24 percent.

Source: Even 18th-Century Creatives Tended to Cluster – CityLab