The Emotional Life of the Toddler

“One study, for example, found that children who showed a secure attachment to their fathers by seeking them out for comfort when feeling stressed had fewer behavior problems and showed more competence in school and peer groups than did those who had an insecure relationship with their fathers.”

— The Emotional Life of the Toddler by Alicia F. Lieberman
http://a.co/5KTWPMl

The Emotional Life of the Toddler

“but the often observed increased involvement of fathers in the toddler years may be linked to findings that fathers as a group are more likely than mothers to promote the adventurous exploration and challenging play that toddlers are now ready to join.”

— The Emotional Life of the Toddler by Alicia F. Lieberman
http://a.co/89HPMXr

The Emotional Life of the Toddler

“Kind firmness also reassures the child that the grown-ups know what they are doing and creates a realistic awareness of and respect for the needs of others through the example of the parents.”

— The Emotional Life of the Toddler by Alicia F. Lieberman
http://a.co/3Y2INSa

The Emotional Life of the Toddler

“It is neither possible nor desirable to be always attuned and responsive to the moods and wishes of children.”

— The Emotional Life of the Toddler by Alicia F. Lieberman
http://a.co/fwr0A4E

The Emotional Life of the Toddler

“Toddlers are scared that displeasing their parents will result in losing their love, and this fear finds expression in the common difficulties of toddlerhood, such as separation anxiety, sleep disturbances, and inexplicable fears.”

— The Emotional Life of the Toddler by Alicia F. Lieberman
http://a.co/dr5pSyB

The Emotional Life of the Toddler

“Two efficient strategies to decrease parent and child mutual frustration are creating safe spaces for toddlers that decrease the need for constant parental intervention and redirecting their attention by enticing them away from forbidden pursuits.”

— The Emotional Life of the Toddler by Alicia F. Lieberman
http://a.co/e2sEW7C