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            <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/21/health/fitness-routine-brain-morning-exercise-mansour/index.html">https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/21/health/fitness-routine-brain-morning-exercise-mansour/index.html</a>       
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“I don’t really like how people know things about me, and I don’t even know them,” she said. “Thousands and millions of things are out there maybe.” Andy, also 7, is always on the lookout for people who might take unflattering photos of him. He once caught his mother taking a photo of him sleeping and, another time, doing a silly dance. He immediately told her not to post it on Facebook, and she obliged. He felt the photos were embarrassing.

Source: When Kids Google Themselves – The Atlantic

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Then, several months ago, when I turned 13, my mom gave me the green light and I joined Twitter and Facebook. The first place I went, of course, was my mom’s profiles. That’s when I realized that while this might have been the first time I was allowed on social media, it was far from the first time my photos and stories had appeared online. When I saw the pictures that she had been posting on Facebook for years, I felt utterly embarrassed, and deeply betrayed.

Source: “I didn’t have control”: A 14-year-old on why she quit social media

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One of the first reassurances I can give families is that Motor Milestones exist on a continuum. Each child achieves these skills at their own time, in their own way. Though we learn motor development from textbooks positing neurodevelopment theory to explain skill acquisition and motor patterning, the manifestation of this progression takes on distinct characteristics when we look at each child as a unique creation.

Source: Teaching Children to Walk Independently!