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I have been playing with options. While I made some decent profit initially, but a couple of bad moves wiped it all. So far I am breaking even. But options feels like a lot more like gambling. Obviously, there are people making living off options and day trading. But hard to find such mentors in real life. I knew one person who was full time commodities trader but I am not sure how big was his account. With small account balance you would be taking on more risky bets to earn livable wage.

Now I am thinking Real Estate might be better investment and wealth building tool. I know several people who are making decent money from their RE investments. Though none of them are truly retired though, still working their day jobs.

“Why Real Estate Made Me A Millionaire and Investing In Stocks Did Not – MyWifeQuitHerJob.com”
— Read on mywifequitherjob.com/why-real-estate-made-me-a-millionaire-and-investing-in-stocks-did-not/

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Research led by the University of Exeter, published in Scientific Reports and funded by NIHR, found that people who spend at least 120 minutes in nature a week are significantly more likely to report good health and higher psychological wellbeing than those who don’t visit nature at all during an average week. However, no such benefits were found for people who visited natural settings such as town parks, woodlands, country parks and beaches for less than 120 minutes a week.

Source: Two hours a week is key dose of nature for health and wellbeing

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It also appears that belonging to the London cluster made writers substantially more productive. Mitchell finds that the average writer in London saw their productivity go up by 12 percent. By comparison, writers in smaller clusters, in Dublin, Edinburgh, Oxford, and Cambridge, saw no such gains. Furthermore, being part of the London cluster increased the likelihood of an author having their work published in any given year by 24 percent.

Source: Even 18th-Century Creatives Tended to Cluster – CityLab

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Posting anon.In 2009, the startup where I was working was hitting the skids, and our investors (correctly) were not willing to back us. We all kept grinding for a month or two in honorable futility, but after a while, my bank account depleted and I had to go.To make various ends meet and to keep my mental health during the wind down however, I took up some contract work that I found through various friends in the SF startup scene. One company that I really liked and did some small stuff for was Burbn, which was a mobile-only location check-in that was hinged around taking photos of your location.Missing my friends in NYC (I made a lot of friends in SF, but my inner circle were my college buddies from CMU; I went to tech and they went finance, sigh), I decided to leave SF to head to NYC and get a fresh start.As I was leaving, I wanted to tie up a few loose ends, so I emailed my contact at Burbn and said I was likely to be unavailable for any more work, but that I liked the project and hoped for the best for him. He responded and said that he was near funding on a small pivot, and that if I was interested, there might be a full-time role available. I declined – I was mentally done with SF and the startup scene (Larry Chiang, 111 Minna, the rise of FB spam-crap like RockYou, etc.) as it was then.That person was Kevin Systrom; that pivot was Instagram.

Source: Posting anon. In 2009, the startup where I was working was hitting the skids, a… | Hacker News